Health and Wellness

I Will Never Be A Morning Person

I Will Never Be A Morning Person

They say that people change over time. That maturity, or life experience, or, just adapting to new forced circumstances will, over time, inherently change who you are. Well, for some people, about some things, this may be true. But there is one thing about me (spoiler alert in the title) that I don’t think will ever change— and that is not being a morning person.

I’ve made it to 42 years on this planet and I can most assuredly say that I don’t like waking up early anymore now than I did when I was, well, ever.

But before I go any further, let’s get clear on how I define “morning person.” To me a morning person is someone who naturally enjoys waking up early (before 7 a.m.) and can be productive, cheerful and conversational. Even if they incorporate some kind of quiet, meditative part of their morning routine, my overall assertion is that for a “morning person,” being awake early is something that is as normal and welcomed as watching a favorite movie.

Truth is, I wish I was a morning person. Early morning is actually a very productive time of the day. The world is still coming to life so that gives time to get a jump on replying to emails, returning phone calls, or kickstarting some daily chores. I know on the rarest of days when I do get up earlier than normal I am able to capture some of this precious time and always feel better for doing so. It’s just not something I enjoy enough.

The Power and Importance of Comfort

The Power and Importance of Comfort

I am typing this blog post at 11:19 at night in bed, laying flat out on my back, with an android tablet suspended over my head while typing on a Bluetooth connected keyboard laying across my legs. And I am completely comfortable. It helps that I have the peaceful sound of my golden fur son's snore purring at my side, and my hubby is here in bed too. I have my heart full with my family love while my head is still filled with whirling thoughts that I want to put into a blog.

This set up has been a long time in the making. I've made previous attempts to no avail. But this time, somewhat born out of necessity, I was determined to find a solution that would work. I came to the realization recently that if I was seriously going to get my blogs launched with some consistent writing, I was going to need to find more time in my day. The only time that is a practical option is the time late in the evening when I am in bed watching YouTube or reading the news on my phone.

If only I had the right set up to type blog posts while in bed.

Being an Introverted Extrovert

Being an Introverted Extrovert

It was no surprise to me that when I did the personality INJT test that the results showed I'm an extrovert. After all, I like to meet new people and I think I am pretty outgoing. And moreover, I'm certainly not the wall flower in the corner of the room.

But lately I'm coming to realize that I might actually be more introverted than I once thought. I'm not afraid to do things by myself that others would find unthinkable-- dining out alone, going to a movie alone, once I even went to the club without my wing-sister! Additionally, it's because of how much effort it takes for me to be extroverted. Typically I have to psyche myself up for a meeting, or do a mental pep-rally to plow through a list of phone calls. Large gatherings, social mixers or crowded malls are all places I'd rather avoid (and I love to shop!)

But life happens right? And I've made a conscious decision that I'm not going to avoid my roles in leadership, experiencing new places, or meeting new people, just because it stresses me out. So to cope pad my schedule so as to not be rushed.

Dealing With Information Overload

Dealing With Information Overload

Something has been on my mind. So much so that i decided to sit down and write about it. But first I did some research (reference links below). The topic centers around information overload. For some time now, I've felt overwhelmed with information. Too much, too many, too everywhere, too all the time. Even before I did some cursory research on the topic I knew that too much information isn't a good thing for optimum cognitive health.

It's reassuring to learn that information overload really is a thing. To know that I'm not alone to feel this way, or that I might be the problem. Researchers have done many studies to understand how the brain works. Results have shown that the brain, as a form of self-preservation, will make a habit the most basic of decisions to process. And of any new information to process, there is a finite amount of information it can take in, and once it hits its limit, that's it.

What has me so perplexed is what to do about it. I know I can't change the information from existing, so how can I change how it impacts my life? How do I change my feeling of resignation, to empowerment?

For the most part I don't have a feeling of FOMO (fear of missing out).

Getting Help for My Fears About Flying

Getting Help for My Fears About Flying

I started the process of facing my fear of flying weeks ago with small steps by simply Googling "fear of flying." Online I found resources that answered some of my questions about the mechanics and safety of flight. I even looked at some YouTube videos of passengers experiencing moderate to heavy turbulence during flight. One of the best realizations I made in my cursory online search for help is that I am not alone in my fear. This was a great comfort and relief and indeed, this helped me feel less afraid over the course of the next few weeks. But when I went to actually book our plane tickets, that familiar paralyzing feeling-- tightness in my chest and a sinking in my stomach-- returned with as strong intensity as ever before.